Your cart

Your cart is empty

What about the Family : Practices of Responsibility in Care

Regular price $165.99
Unit price
per
  • Author:
    LINDEMANN Hilde / MCLAUGHLIN Janice / VERKERK
  • ISBN:
    9780190624880
  • Publication Date:
    May 2019
  • Edition:
    1
  • Pages:
    224
  • Binding:
    Hardback
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press
  • Country of Publication:
What about the Family : Practices of Responsibility in Care
What about the Family : Practices of Responsibility in Care

What about the Family : Practices of Responsibility in Care

Regular price $165.99
Unit price
per
  • Author:
    LINDEMANN Hilde / MCLAUGHLIN Janice / VERKERK
  • ISBN:
    9780190624880
  • Publication Date:
    May 2019
  • Edition:
    1
  • Pages:
    224
  • Binding:
    Hardback
  • Publisher:
    Oxford University Press
  • Country of Publication:
(0 in cart)
Shipping calculated at checkout.

You may also like

  • Product description

    Health and social care decisions, and how they impact a family, are often viewed from the perspective of the individual family member making themfor example, the role of the parent in surrogacy questions, the care of the elderly, or decisions that involve fetuses or organ donations. What About the Family? represents a concerted, collaborative effort to depart from this practiceit rather shows that the family unit as a whole is intrinsic and inseparable from patient's ethical decisions. This deeper level of thinking about families and health care poses an entirely new set of difficult questions. Which family members are relevant in influencing a patient? What is a family, in the first place? What duties does a family have to its own members? What makes an ethics of families distinctive from health care ethics, an ethic of care or feminist ethics is that it theorizes relationships characterized by ongoing intimacy and partiality among people who are not interchangeable, and remains centered on the practices of responsibility arising from these relationships.

    What About the Family? edited by bioethicists Hilde Lindemann, Marian Verkerk, and Janice McLaughlin, represents an interdisciplinary effort, drawing, among other resources, on its authors' backgrounds in sociology, nursing, philosophy, bioethics, and the medical sciences. Contributors begin from the assumption that any ethical examination of the significance of family ties to health and social care will benefit from a dialogue with the debates about family occuring in these other disciplinary areas, and examine why families matter, how families are recognized, how families negotiate responsibilities, how families can participate in treatment decision making, and how justice operates in families.

    Featured in the July 2019 Psychology newsletter.
    To receive this newsletter regularly please email us with your name and contact details.

Product description

Health and social care decisions, and how they impact a family, are often viewed from the perspective of the individual family member making themfor example, the role of the parent in surrogacy questions, the care of the elderly, or decisions that involve fetuses or organ donations. What About the Family? represents a concerted, collaborative effort to depart from this practiceit rather shows that the family unit as a whole is intrinsic and inseparable from patient's ethical decisions. This deeper level of thinking about families and health care poses an entirely new set of difficult questions. Which family members are relevant in influencing a patient? What is a family, in the first place? What duties does a family have to its own members? What makes an ethics of families distinctive from health care ethics, an ethic of care or feminist ethics is that it theorizes relationships characterized by ongoing intimacy and partiality among people who are not interchangeable, and remains centered on the practices of responsibility arising from these relationships.

What About the Family? edited by bioethicists Hilde Lindemann, Marian Verkerk, and Janice McLaughlin, represents an interdisciplinary effort, drawing, among other resources, on its authors' backgrounds in sociology, nursing, philosophy, bioethics, and the medical sciences. Contributors begin from the assumption that any ethical examination of the significance of family ties to health and social care will benefit from a dialogue with the debates about family occuring in these other disciplinary areas, and examine why families matter, how families are recognized, how families negotiate responsibilities, how families can participate in treatment decision making, and how justice operates in families.

Featured in the July 2019 Psychology newsletter.
To receive this newsletter regularly please email us with your name and contact details.